Posts in five things
Five Things #126

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. Rob Reid's After-On podcast very quickly became one of my favourites. I subscribe to far more podcasts than I could dream to listen to, but I always listen to After-On. His most recent episode with Laurie Santos was on the science of happiness, listen to it! You'll learn a ton.

  2. This story is kinda difficult to summarise in a paragraph... Lil Miquela is a bot and social media influencer with over a million followers on Instagram. She admits to not being real and was once hacked and replaced by a Trump fan. It's all a bit strange but makes for an interesting read. 2018 is weird.

  3. Food for thought from Seth Godin. Are you the world's worst boss?

  4. An interesting breakdown of the music theory behind David Wise's Donkey Kong Country soundtracks. One for the music nerds!

  5. A great Bowie quote on creativity (click through for the longer quote): "I learned that mixing elements of bad taste with good would often produce the most interesting results…. It wasn’t so much about how I felt about things, but rather, how things around me felt."

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

Five Things #125

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. This isn't a particularly fun read but it's well worth reading: This Is How We Radicalized The World

  2. Merriam-Webster have a fun new tool called Time Traveler which allows you to find when words or phrases first appeared in print by year. My birth year, 1988, was clearly a golden year: "Channel surfing", "emo", "JPEG", "mad cow disease", "mosh pit", "unibrow".

  3. Tiny books that fit in one hand might be the future of physical books! They look pretty cool but I'll be sticking with my Kindle for now — which you can also use to read with one hand!

  4. An interesting piece on how AI is being used in music. It's hard to imagine that AI composers will ever totally replace human composers, but it'll be just another tool in a composers tool kit.

  5. On a related note... Ólafur Arnalds recently explained how he's been experimenting with using algorithms to augment his music: "The idea behind this is not to create a computer that makes music for me, it's to create an instrument that I'm playing". Here's his performance on NPR's Tiny Desk series.

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

Five Things #124

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. I've been on a good run with books recently. Last week I started and finished Bad Blood by John Carreyrou. The book investigates the rapid rise and fall of the blood testing startup Theranos and it's founder Elizabeth Holmes. Theranos was a company built on lies, deception and a dangerous disregard for good science. It's an astonishing story.

  2. A great profile of Eric Barone the one man team behind the popular indie video game Stardew Valley: "It took him four and a half years to design, program, animate, draw, compose, record, and write everything in the game, working 12-hour days, seven days a week. His budget was the part-time wage he made as an evening usher at the local stage theater."

  3. A slightly different profile, this time of the world's oldest hairdresser, Anthony Mancinelli, he's 107 and still cutting hair full time. What a guy!

  4. How could this not bring a smile to your face? The Super Mario Bros. Overworld and Underworld themes played on the marimba.

  5. Metric have a new album called Art of Doubt and it's very good! A few tracks to check out if you don't have time to dive into the whole album: Dark Saturday, Art of Doubt, Die Happy.

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

Five Things #123
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Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. Super Mario Bros. with a full sized jazz big band, orchestra and choir — so cool! Here's another video where Charlie Rosen explains how he approached arranging the whole project.

  2. The Verge Science channel on YouTube have been producing a tonne of great videos. This one on the causes of rising sea levels was particularly interesting.

  3. An interesting read on the future of self driving and electric cars. Quite a headline too: "Why you have (probably) already bought your last car". Unfortunately I doubt it's true for me and my car!

  4. A different perspective on self driving cars: "The Key to Autonomous Driving? An Impossibly Perfect Map".

  5. To celebrate the 10 year anniversary of Spotify's release, Spotify has revealed its most-played tracks and artists over the last decade... And, not totally unsurprisingly, they're quite an uninspiring lists! Far too much Drake and Ed Sheeran for my liking!

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

Five Things #122
trogir by ross farley.jpg

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. What a photo, it looks like something straight out of the film Inception. It is in fact a street in Macau with the Grand Lisboa casino in the background. Quite surreal!

  2. Don't you just love it when you start reading a book and you can't put it down? Ben MacIntyre's latest The Spy and the Traitor is one of those books. It tells the true story of a KGB double agent during the Cold War... I highly, highly recommend it.

  3. An interesting video from the Kurzgesagt YouTube channel on how we could go about building a Moon base and colonising the Moon. It's kinda crazy something like this hasn't happened already seeing that the moon landing was all the way back in 1969!

  4. I hope drummers and non-drummers will both equally appreciate this rather bizarre performance.

  5. I've just discovered the musical duo Hannie and their loop videos. I particularly like this one and this one.

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

Five Things #121

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. Serial, the hugely popular podcast that introduced many people to the existence of podcasts, is back with a third series! If you haven't heard the first series, you should listen to that too.

  2. Some truly terrible knock knock jokes courtesy of a machine learning algorithm.

  3. A great article/ interview with Nicolas Cage. He's an interesting guy, but I'm not convinced "Nicolas Cage", "greatest" and "actor" are words that should ever appear in the same sentence.

  4. Well, I never knew that: Why we say “OK”

  5. A collection of the winning photos from the 2018 Global Physics Photowalk competition. I think the photographer of the photo that won second place can feel a little hard done by!

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

Five Things #120

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. It's like a time machine for your ears "Conserve the sound is an online museum for vanishing and endangered sounds. The sound of a dial telephone, a walkman, a[n] analog typewriter, a pay phone, a 56k modem, a nuclear power plant or even a cell phone keypad are partially already gone or are about to disappear from our daily life."

  2. Watch out composers of generic ad music, AI is coming for your job!

  3. I'm really enjoying the current series of the Crazy/Genius podcast (I also recommended one of their podcasts last week). In the most recent episode they explore the question Will We Ever Stop Eating Animal Meat? I love eating meat, but given facts like "animal farming takes up 30 percent of the earth’s landmass" and "livestock causes one-sixth of global greenhouse gas emissions" it's clear something needs to change. We need to seriously cut down on how much meat we eat or get comfortable with the alternatives, like lab grown meat... or crickets?

  4. Another podcast recommendation — I listen to a lot of podcasts! BBC Radio 4's Intrigue: The Ratline investigates the disappearance of a senior Nazi who was indicted for mass murder. And if that doesn't quite sell it to you, how about this: "The Ratline is story of a curious death, political intrigue, spies, Nazi hunters, shadowy forces in the Vatican and a son grappling with the sins of his father". Intrigued?

  5. Tyler Cowen on how to have a good conversation. I'm not a fan of small talk so his first point "have easy outs" would also make my list!

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

five thingsRoss FarleyComment
Five Things #119
split by ross farley.jpeg

Every Tuesday I share five things I've liked and think you might like too. Here are this week’s Five Things…

  1. The Crazy/Genius podcast asks Can We Extend Human Lifespans to 150? If we can, my response is enthusiastically "yes please!"... Assuming that my body and brain will stay functional at that grand old age!

  2. Two more podcast recommendations for you, both with Jaron Lanier (author of Ten Arguments For Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now) on The Ezra Klein Show. They talk about virtual reality, the problems with our modern internet and social networks, politics and much more. Jaron comes across as a very thoughtful, insiteful and lovely human! Here's the first episode, and here's the second.

  3. This is really interesting (well, to me anyway). Vox explains the surprising pattern behind colour names around the world.

  4. The 2018 world population in one colourful map and some background info and facts to accompany it.

  5. The problem of streaming, fake plays and the music charts. With Spotify, Apple Music and their algorithms serving up new music and relevant releases that they think you'll like, do people even pay attention to the charts any more?

That's all for this week. If you enjoyed it, subscribe and you'll get the next one delivered to your inbox.

five thingsRoss FarleyComment